THE Call (Part 2)

Smith: “I met with the counselor you talked to right before you left. He said there was some abuse going on in your home. What kind would you say is going on?”

Me: “Physical and emotional. *pause* But I wasn’t home for a year, I don’t know how much information I can really give you… I feel like I won’t really be of much help.. Jace (my next oldest brother) would be able to help you more….”

Smith: “Well, I would like to ask you some questions now, and then depending on what you tell me, I might meet with him as well. Now would you say there’s more physical or emotional abuse in your home?”

Me: “For the older kids, emotional. For the younger kids, physical.”

Smith: “Let’s talk about the emotional abuse. What kinds of things are being said.”

Me: “Well, my parents tell us we’re worthless and insignificant and that we can never do anything right…”

Smith: “What phrases do they use specifically?”

Me: “We’re worthless. We’re insignificant. We can’t do anything right. Oh, and they remind us that they’re our dictators. I hate that the most.”

Smith: “How often does this happen?”

Me: “Every single day without fail.”

Smith: “Who do they say these things to?”

Me: “All of us kids, including the youngest ones.”

Smith: “When was the last time you heard them use one of these phrases?”

Me: “The last day I was home this summer.”

Officer Smith seemed surprised… Partially because he’s close to both of my parents. Partially because I talk like it’s normal for parents to talk to their kids this way. I wasn’t aware that it was abnormal until I started seeing how my friends’ parents treated them.

I didn’t include that my parents have said worse to me… I felt like he just wanted the usual phrases that they used on a daily basis, and he seemed satisfied enough with my answers.

Background Info…

“Let me explain. No, there is too much. Let me sum up.”

I was born and raised in Southern Nevada. After I graduated high school, I studied in Idaho for a year, moved back to Nevada to work for the summer, and now I live in Utah.

I’m the oldest of 6 children – I have 2 brothers and 3 sisters.

I love them a lot. I miss them often.

I worry about them constantly..

I keep stressing and worrying because I feel so helpless.. There’s not a lot I can do from over 300 miles away. I’m doing what I can.. I just hope it will work..

 

Why would I abandon them? Why would I leave them if they needed me? How could I do that to them if I really loved them?

 

Don’t make me feel worse than I already do. I was told to leave. My counselor said it would be the best thing I could do, and he assured me my little siblings would be taken care of while I was gone. Officer Smith would work with them once school started and hopefully something would start to change in their favor.

So I left. I moved to Utah with the blind hope that the future would soon be brighter than when I left. I’ve been stressing the entire time I’ve been away from those poor kids (which has been just over 3 weeks now).

 

I realize reading this it may sound like the 6 of us kids were living together on our own, and now I’ve left them without anyone to watch over them. This assumption would be false. The problem isn’t that the kids don’t have a guardian.

 

The problem is that they’re living with our parents.

 

My parents got married in 1990 and have loved each other ever since. They had 6 kids together. I’ve moved out of the house, my next oldest brother is a senior in high school, and my youngest brother is in first grade. My mother is a “domestic engineer” and my father is a Fire Engineer. My family has family night every Monday, chores every Saturday morning, and family dinner every single night. My dad teaches us how to fix our bikes, change a tire on a car, and fix every electronic device in the house as well as how to play sports (specifically baseball). My mom taught us how to cook, clean, sing, and play the piano.

We look like a picture perfect family.

 

This assumption would also be entirely false.

 

 

 

Quote: said by character Inigo Montoya in the movie “The Princess Bride.”